My Journey trying Diets to Treat My Ulcerative Colitis

Typically, on the raw food diet, about 75 to 80 percent of what you eat each day will be plant-based foods never heated above 115 degrees Fahrenheit. Sometimes it’s denial that causes unfortunate decisions. Throughout my medical journey, there have been many options for treatment. Soon those options faded, leaving only treatments unapproved by the Food and Drug Administration. These treatments were diets, which we often find appealing because they make us want to look, feel and simply be better. In many cases, diets are necessary – and the one thing that can save an individual from painstaking medical experiences. Hundreds of diets are on the market, and many come with catchy appeals. When a diet can save someone, is it worth a try? It all began one day when we were running out of allopathic treatment options. I have ulcerative colitis, and my disease was becoming more and more active by the day. Our final option was to get a colectomy (full removal of the colon). This was a defeating option because there is no “colon transplant,” so once it’s gone, it’s gone. My mother called a homeopathic (natural-based healing) office, and thus began our adventure to solve my unsolvable… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

Coping With the Regret That Surrounds a Chronic Illness

‘I, the same person who a couple years ago had difficulty putting one foot in front of the other without feeling dizzy, could climb a difficult hill and feel great while doing so.’ Regret: the fine line between an emotional breakdown and the feeling of hopelessness. Those of you with or even without a chronic illness know exactly what it feels like to regret. I am a freshman at Indiana University and was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease, when I was 6. Truthfully, I have missed out on a normal life, but I have been equally fortunate with so many opportunities to travel and expand advocacy efforts for individuals suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases and other chronic conditions. When I find myself regretting my medical decisions, I end up in an indestructible bubble of negative thoughts. Regret that surrounds a chronic illness can truly be the one emotional strain on top of insurmountable physical obstacles. We often regret our medical decisions; for example, whether we should have agreed to that irreversible surgery or not. I thought hard about my surgery, but it’s been difficult – even now – and here’s why. I was a freshman in high school when… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

How to Succeed in the Face of a Life-Altering Disease

My high-school experience was amazing and unforgettable. After living with ulcerative colitis for more than 12 years, the most valuable thing I learned is that absolutely anything is possible. Some would say I am a success story, considering that after living most of my life with severe ulcerative colitis and resulting complications, I was able to graduate as a part of the top-20 of my class of 600. But these past four years in high school have been my choice to live like I didn’t have ulcerative colitis. My “successes” and “failures” in high school have been driven by the idea that colitis would be a part of me, but I would not be a part of it.   My detailed story with ulcerative colitis can be found here. Recently, I was selected as a Coca-Cola Scholar and an Eli Lilly Scholar, meaning my college experience is paid for. Behind this scholarship is an unforgettable journey of triumphs and defeats. I was told, when my major flare-up started in sixth grade, that each day would be new and that I would need to take it easier than my classmates. I didn’t understand why at the time, but as my disease progressed,… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

We Need More Research- Sneha Dave

When I was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis at age six, I did not know the severe impact it would have on my future abilities. Collectively, two diseases, Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s Disease are known as Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). Ulcerative Colitis causes ulcers in the large intestine, which in turn affects the entire body. I was diagnosed at a young age, and thus my disease was incredibly aggressive. There are currently no known cures, and while the incidence of IBD rises, approximately 1.6 million Americans are suffering—including around 30,000 people in Indiana alone. Increasingly, the younger population is being diagnosed, and with that I felt the need to start the Crohn’s and Colitis Teen Times, a nonprofit organization that provides support to teens and adults suffering with IBD and other chronic conditions. One of my inspirations, Cory Lane, who passed away with Crohn’s Disease and Osteosarcoma suffered a many years with Crohn’s. The treatment that is currently available is great for disease management, but it comes with side effects as well. Often times treatment and research is not focused on for IBD, because the two diseases are in most cases not necessarily directly deadly, but there side effects can be,… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

Rainbows After the Rain: My Journey to Becoming a Coke Scholar

My journey to becoming a Coca-Cola Scholar is as unique as is for each Scholar, but for me this scholarship proved to be a defining moment after years of physical and mental recovery. Just like rainbows come after rain, miracles come after struggles. For me, this major obstacle began when I was six years old. I was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the entire body. In middle school, I attended classes on a part-time basis and could barely walk up the stairs by myself. Emergency situations followed as my bone marrow stopped working from medications and my body began deteriorating. As a 9th grader, I weighed 60 pounds, was fed through a PICC line, and went to the hospital weekly for infusions. My large intestine was removed, and several surgeries and procedures followed. That same year, I lost my best friend to Crohn’s Disease (very similar to Ulcerative Colitis) and Osteosarcoma. Before he passed away, we both felt the need for more advocacy for individuals with chronic conditions. The creation of a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, the Crohn’s and Colitis Teen Times, came soon after. Now, three years later, I blog for U.S. News (often featured on Yahoo! News… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

Why I Became an Advocate for People With Chronic Disease

Why I Became an Advocate for People With Chronic Disease Here’s why you should become an advocate, too. Elderly woman holding hand. Share your experience to lend a helping hand. By Sneha Dave Feb. 24, 2016, at 9:43 a.m. + More Dreamers are given the gift to believe, and for me believing became life-changing. I came home from the hospital after losing my entire large intestine in a hard fight with ulcerative colitis. The next day, I gave up, because I felt that I had lost. One week later, though, I received a transformational gift. I am not sure where that gift came from, but it was a fighting spirit. I have always had an incredibly supportive family, but I had no one who could truly relate to what I was going through, and I felt alone in battling ulcerative colitis. Not wanting others with chronic health conditions to feel alone in their fight, I decided to get into advocacy. I also became an advocate because my best friend died of osteosarcoma – a cancer that starts in the bones – and the chronic inflammatory bowel condition Crohn’s disease, and because I lost my childhood to ulcerative… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

Climate Justice Through Clean Cooking: A Teens Perspective

Climate Justice Through Clean Cooking: A Teen’s Perspective Share on twitterShare on facebookShare on emailShare on printMore Sharing Services By: Sneha Dave December 07, 2015 Alliance News Raymond Ochieng Kenyan woman and child Empathy is the most powerful weapon, and it creates the most forceful change. When I first went to the “Women In Peace” panel in Washington, D.C. as a prospective Georgetown student, I did not know about some of the most pressing and remarkably unknown problems that women and girls are facing right know. It was not until I heard the CEO of the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, Radha Muthiah, speak about the vulnerability of girls and women, that I realized how unsafe cooking methods are putting girls and women’s health and safety at risk. At age six, I was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis, a chronic and severe illness, which has no cure and no known cause, I have lost my entire large intestine and most of my childhood to this disease. Today, I am a seventeen-year-old who suffers from chronic illness, and I know how important it is to prevent them in any way possible. I have recently learned more about the widespread… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

How to Return to a Normal Life After You’re Diagnosed With a Chronic Illness

One teen’s advice on staying resilient. Feeling like you fit in with your peer group after you’re diagnosed with a chronic illness can be challenging. By Sneha Dave Sept. 28, 2015 | 8:53 a.m. EDT There are really no words to describe how it felt to step outside the house and think that everything I’d gone through for the past few years had potentially ended. Although it was the end of many grueling years, it was the start of a new journey, and the start of new societal learning experiences. It wasn’t until my ulcerative colitis become aggressive that I became isolated from the society I grew up in. Even though I was diagnosed at age 6, my illness began to give me serious medical setbacks at the beginning of sixth grade. From sixth grade until about the middle of ninth grade, I lived a life that many would call completely isolated. Ulcerative colitis is a disease with devastatingly embarrassing symptoms, like frequent restroom usage and accidents. In my case, I became so weak that I needed assistance even to walk, especially stairs. A homebound and secluded life became a weight that brought my… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

A Camp for Kids With Crohn’s and Colitis

A Camp for Kids With Crohn’s and Colitis ​Find the support you need to battle your disease. A girl suffers from a painful stomach ache. Ulcerative colitis can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to abdominal pain and cramping. By Sneha Dave Aug. 6, 2015 | 10:18 a.m. EDT + More ​As I reflect back on an amazing week at Camp Oasis – a camp for kids with Crohn’s disease ​and ulcerative colitis – I find the four years I have been able to attend this camp have had a lasting impact on me. Established by the​ Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, the camp has shown me that there are other people, especially teens, suffering with the same problems I face. Having the opportunity to relate to them​ allowed me to gain a whole new perspective on my disease. Diagnosed at age 6 with colitis, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease, my mom sheltered me from society, fearing that people wouldn’t be able to understand the disease. Like many other diseases, colitis is complex, and it causes embarrassing issues, including frequently needing to use the restroom. So it’s difficult to talk about, especially with kids and teens. But… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

How to Stay Positive When Life Includes Serious Chronic Illness

How to Stay Positive When Life Includes a Serious Chronic Illness A teen with ulcerative colitis has this advice for the millions of Americans battling a chronic illness. ‘The mountains I climb today will lead to the peaks I’ll reach tomorrow,’ the author writes. By Sneha Dave July 17, 2015 | 11:02 a.m. EDT + More I remember when I was carefree, and could step outside with a Cheshire-cat smile, worrying about nothing more than when snack time was. After being diagnosed with ulcerative colitis at age 6, I longed to reclaim that peaceful mindset free of worries, doubts and insecurities. While it’s difficult to stay positive during a severe illness, it’s amazing how much you can overcome the negativity that infringes upon you in tough times. Here’s what has helped me get by: Know That Better Moments Are to Come There was a point when I’d wake up around 20 times a night to use the restroom. I could barely get any sleep. These nights were absolutely dreadful, as I would awake with spasms that would paralyze every part of my body. The pain was unimaginable, but I knew I had to get through it. I… Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)